Natural bodybuilders vs steroids

A great deal of what we know about steroids is derived from competitive bodybuilding; all of it, of course not but there is a debt that is owed. Moreover, as we have discussed, what we know and understand of anabolic hormones has in many cases led to a better understanding of how our muscles work, how our hormonal structure and function is laid out and in within these understandings we have found ourselves wiser in-terms of general health and fitness. A great deal of what we see today in popular culture is owed to steroids and competitive bodybuilding and since the two go hand-in-hand many aspects of fitness can trace their roots to competitive bodybuilding.

Thanks to competitive bodybuilding we have seen an explosion of a more health and fitness aware society; the gyms where we exercise were built by competitive bodybuilders, the exercises and routines, the basic nutritional principles we understand were all first discovered and perfected by competitive bodybuilders; without them there is no fitness craze. Nevertheless, because of the negative attention they are given and the manner in-which they are often perceived, steroids have always been viewed as a major sore on the competitive sport yet without them the competitive sport would not exist as it does and we wouldn’t understand the things we do.

The truth of the matter is competitive bodybuilding represents the base and root form of many things admired in popular culture. The bigger than life action heroes of the silver screen, they owe their existence to bodybuilding; professional wrestling, how we utilize training for sports such as football and baseball, boxing and for the most part all competitive sports, they owe much of their existence in their present form to bodybuilding. The macho muscular identity many men aspire to, its roots are largely founded in bodybuilding and what’s perhaps most interesting of all is in each of these aspects steroids are a major part of the game. Our desire for things that are bigger than life, in all aspects of life, while some of them are unique unto their own many have roots that run long and deep in a connection with bodybuilding and steroids as a whole.

This is the scenario: a guy, say age 21, becomes serious about gaining muscle. He’s 5′ 10″, 7″ wrists, 9″ ankles, average genetics for muscle size-and-proportioned. He’s played sports, but never done more than an occasional resistance workout. Now, he begins a good training-eating-and-resting program. With his genetics, he has the potential for naturally gaining 45 pounds of lean mass if he stays consistent with progressive training/proper eating for a continuous 3 to 4 years.
But, about three months after beginning his training, he starts taking steroids. He does three steroid cycles in the following 18 months, and includes proper post-cycle therapy. That entire time, he’s continuing to consistently train and eat properly. Before the end of two years, he’s gained 45 pounds of lean mass (which with steroids, by the way, is not necessarily typical but neither improbable). At that point, he permanently quits using steroids, but he does continue properly training and eating for another two years. At the end of four years, he carries the same 45 pounds of lean mass.

Natural bodybuilder Nick Miller, who offers tips and information on professional bodybuilding, recently released the YouTube video above on whether or not WWE Champion Jinder Mahal should be tested for steroids. In the video, Miller discussed the transformation of Mahal's physique from average to what it is today, which preceded WWE putting him over Randy Orton for the WWE Championship at Backlash last month. Nick pulled up the WWE Wellness Policy on the company's official website and showed the list of banned anabolic androgenic substances that Mahal could have used to transform his body, explaining they are officially banned under the policy. See Also Jinder Mahal On People Thinking He's On Steroids, What Supplements He Takes, Go-To Fast Food Spot Miller then highlighted the portion of WWE's Wellness Policy that explains reasonable suspicion for testing, specially reading a section from 8A, which states: "Reasonable Suspicion. WWE may require WWE Talent to submit to a test or tests, including, without limitation, urine, blood, saliva, hair, and/or breath tests, if there exists reasonable suspicion that a WWE Talent has violated any part of this Policy or has diminished ability to perform as a result of using any prohibited substance" He read from paragraph two, which defines observation of signs, symptoms and/or behaviors known to accompany the use of prohibited substances. Nick highlighted four signs that Mahal could be using steroids. First, he looked at Mahal's extreme vascularity followed by an "extreme almost unreasonable level" of low body fat and leanness from match to match. Miller showed the dramatic transformation of Jinder Mahal, which he called a "dad bod" to what he is today. Finally, Miller pointed to Mahal having gynecomastia, a condition caused by a hormonal imbalance or, elevated estrogen levels from possibly not recovering correctly from a steroid cycle. Miller concluded his video by saying that he believes Jinder Mahal should be tested for steroids based on the WWE Wellness Policy and the results of that test should determine whether or not he should be WWE Champion. Mahal has not shied away from the fact his body has dramatically transformed over the past year, something he credits to extreme dieting and complete alcohol cessation. Got a news tip or correction? Send it to us by clicking here .

I think this approach is fine. I must say having been doing this for years, treating hundreds and thousands of men I have been underwhelmed with the results with topicals. Injections can cause peaks and valley and I have many younger men inject twice a week that smooths out the peaks and valleys. I think it is appropriate to follow the advice of your primary doctor and endocrinologist. I have just seen too many men spend months or years with gels with sub optimal results. Many men are diagnosed with depression and are not really depressed (I have no idea if this applies to you), but the presumed depression is base dupon low T.
My recommendation would be to pursue this but if a few months pass and results are modest consider another approach. Pellets are one approach to have smooth levels of T and are placed every 4 months.

Natural bodybuilders vs steroids

natural bodybuilders vs steroids

I think this approach is fine. I must say having been doing this for years, treating hundreds and thousands of men I have been underwhelmed with the results with topicals. Injections can cause peaks and valley and I have many younger men inject twice a week that smooths out the peaks and valleys. I think it is appropriate to follow the advice of your primary doctor and endocrinologist. I have just seen too many men spend months or years with gels with sub optimal results. Many men are diagnosed with depression and are not really depressed (I have no idea if this applies to you), but the presumed depression is base dupon low T.
My recommendation would be to pursue this but if a few months pass and results are modest consider another approach. Pellets are one approach to have smooth levels of T and are placed every 4 months.

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