Purpura corticosteroids

Because of the potential complications of both the disease and its treatment, it's important for you and your doctor to carefully weigh the benefits and risks of treatment. For example, some people find that the side effects of treatment are more burdensome than the effects of the disease itself. Other factors that might affect your decision include whether or not you have other medical conditions or take medications that could increase your risk of bleeding, and whether or not you have an active lifestyle that could increase the risk of injury and bleeding.

Oral and injectable systemic corticosterois are steroid hormones prescribed to decrease inflammation in diseases and conditions such as arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, for example), ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, asthma, bronchitis, some skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions that involve the nose and eyes. Examples of systemic corticosteroids include hydrocortisone (Cortef), cortisone, prednisone (Prednisone Intensol), prednisolone (Orapred, Prelone), and methylprednisolone (Medrol, Depo-Medrol, Solu-Medrol). Some of the side effects of systemic corticosteroids are swelling of the legs, hypertension, headache, easy bruising, facial hair growth, diabetes, cataracts, and puffiness of the face.

In cerebral edema , Dexamethasone sodium phosphate injection is generally administered initially in a dosage of 10 mg intravenously followed by 4 mg every six hours intramuscularly until the symptoms of cerebral edema subside. Response is usually noted within 12 to 24 hours and dosage may be reduced after two to four days and gradually discontinued over a period of five to seven days. For palliative management of patients with recurrent or inoperable brain tumors, maintenance therapy with either Dexamethasone sodium phosphate injection or Dexamethasone tablets in a dosage of 2 mg two or three times daily may be effective.

AP may be mild, lasting only two or three days. However, for those children with moderate to severe symptoms, AP may last for four to six weeks, with relapses in about half of all children within six weeks, especially if the child contracts another respiratory infection or is exposed to the allergic agent. Relapses can occur up to seven years after the initial disease. Full recovery occurs in most cases without kidney involvement. However, one fourth of children who have kidney symptoms still have detectable problems years later. There is a higher likelihood of permanent renal damage with a higher number of recurrences.

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Purpura corticosteroids

purpura corticosteroids

AP may be mild, lasting only two or three days. However, for those children with moderate to severe symptoms, AP may last for four to six weeks, with relapses in about half of all children within six weeks, especially if the child contracts another respiratory infection or is exposed to the allergic agent. Relapses can occur up to seven years after the initial disease. Full recovery occurs in most cases without kidney involvement. However, one fourth of children who have kidney symptoms still have detectable problems years later. There is a higher likelihood of permanent renal damage with a higher number of recurrences.

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