Steroid responsive dermatoses symptoms

A 14-year-old boy, without any preceding history of trauma, meningoencephalitis or seizures, was admitted in a comatose state. A similar episode of loss of consciousness 2 months prior with normal neuroimaging and electroencephalogram (EEG) had been followed by behavioral alterations. A year previously, during evaluation for increased appetite and poor weight gain, he was noted to have small goitre with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) mIU/L, T3 nmol/L, and T4 nmol/L. Routine hemogram, blood biochemistry, thyroid function tests including free hormone levels, ultrasonography thyroid and magnetic resonance imaging were normal. EEG showed diffuse slowing of all waves. Cerebrospinal fluid showed no pleocytosis and electrophoresis showed oligoclonal band. Viral studies and serum N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody levels were negative. Anti-thyroid peroxidase (Anti-TPO) antibodies were raised. Intervention was with intravenous dexamethasone 4 mg every 6 h for 1 week followed by tapering schedule of oral prednisolone over 6 months.

Occlusive Dressing Technique

Occlusive dressings may be used for the management of psoriasis or other recalcitrant rub a small amount of cream into the lesion until it disappears. Reapply the preparation leaving a thin coating on the lesion, cover with pliable nonporous film, and seal the edges. If needed, additional moisture may be provided by covering the lesion with a dampened clean cotton cloth before the nonporous film is applied or by briefly wetting the affected area with water immediately prior to applying the medication. The frequency of changing dressings is best determined on an individual basis. It may be convenient to apply Triamcinolone acetonide cream under an occlusive dressing in the evening and to remove the dressing in the morning (., 12-hour occlusion). When utilizing the12-hour occlusion regimen, additional cream should be applied, without occlusion, during the day. Reapplication is essential at each dressing change. If an infection develops, the use of occlusive dressings should be discontinued and appropriate antimicrobial therapy instituted.

Steroid Responsive Meningitis - Samantha Goldberg BVSc MRCVS

Neck Pain and Fever in a Boxer--NAVA Clinician's Brief, November 2009
The Five Minute Veterinary Consult Page 388,
J AM Vet Med Assoc 201[10]:1553-8 Nov 15'92--Systemic Necrotizing Vasculitis in Nine Young Beagles.
J Vet Inter Med 4[2]:112 Mar/Apr'90 ACVIM 8th Annual Forum--Systemic Vasculitis {Canine Pain Syndrome} in young beagles
J Vet Intern Med 2[1]:26-35 Jan/Mar'88 123 Refs--Canine Meningitis:A Changing Emphasis
The Veterinary Record, June 17, 1978--Polyarteritis in a colony of beagles.
The Veterinary Record, April 7th 1973--Polyarteritis in the Dog: A Case Report   Dr. Roughie’s Questions and Answers- Steroid Responsive Meningitis-Vasculitis: The Disease With Many Names   Kasmin D. Bittle DVM   /images/Health/Dr-Roughie-ST-Column/
Neck Pain By Dr. J. E. Dillberger,  /images/Health/Dr-Roughie-ST-Column/

Cells of the zona fasciculata and zona reticularis lack aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) that converts corticosterone to aldosterone, and thus these tissues produce only the weak mineralocorticoid corticosterone. However, both these zones do contain the CYP17A1 missing in zona glomerulosa and thus produce the major glucocorticoid, cortisol. Zona fasciculata and zona reticularis cells also contain CYP17A1, whose 17,20-lyase activity is responsible for producing the androgens, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione. Thus, fasciculata and reticularis cells can make corticosteroids and the adrenal androgens, but not aldosterone.

Steroid responsive dermatoses symptoms

steroid responsive dermatoses symptoms

Cells of the zona fasciculata and zona reticularis lack aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) that converts corticosterone to aldosterone, and thus these tissues produce only the weak mineralocorticoid corticosterone. However, both these zones do contain the CYP17A1 missing in zona glomerulosa and thus produce the major glucocorticoid, cortisol. Zona fasciculata and zona reticularis cells also contain CYP17A1, whose 17,20-lyase activity is responsible for producing the androgens, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione. Thus, fasciculata and reticularis cells can make corticosteroids and the adrenal androgens, but not aldosterone.

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